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Charter Members 1897 Austin: American History Club   Pathfinders Club* Cleburn: Magazine Club Corsicana: XIX Century Club Dallas:             Current Events Club                          Pierian Club Shakespeare Club Standard Club Dennison: XXI Club* Denton: Ariel Club Fort Worth:      Woman’s Wednesday Club       ’93 Club* Galveston: Wednesday Study Club Houston: Women’s Club Ladies Reading Club McKinney: Owl Club Sherman: Shakespeare Club Terrell: Social Science Club Tyler: Quid Nunc Club Waco:              Literary Club Woman’s Club * no delegate - sent letter of application GFWC TEXAS: A HISTORY Made with Xara GFWC Texas has a rich heritage, a tapestry of state and national accomplishments woven through the centuries. GFWC Texas is also known for its history of strong, independent women who blazed trails in the arts, conservation, education, home life, international issues, and public awareness. Through the activities of Texas clubwomen, small towns and larger communities became better places to live, work and play. Club women all over the state banded together to form one of the largest state federations in the orbit of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs www.GFWC.org Towards the end of the nineteenth century women around the world were stretching the boundaries of their lives by obtaining degrees of higher education, working outside the home, becoming involved in politics and embracing causes that would enhance the lives of others and ultimately change the world. By the early twentieth century the growing women’s club movement promoted social reforms, education and cultural improvements. It was in these clubs that the women discussed the events of the day, wrote and read papers on various topics of interest, learned parliamentary procedures and became comfortable speaking and appearing in public. The club women in Texas were not to be left out of this dynamic women’s club movement. Actually GFWC Texas began with a trip to the State Fair in Dallas. In the Fall of 1894, while the husbands “took in the fair”, the delegates of the “Woman’s Congress” formulated the idea of combining the various literary, music, garden and other women’s clubs into one statewide organization. This concept of federation, an interchange of thoughts and efforts between clubs, took hold and May 13-14, 1897 delegates from 18 clubs met in Waco and organized the Texas Federation of Women’s Clubs and in 1899 voted unanimously to affiliate with the General Federation of Women’s Clubs. Our badge of office In 1951 a State President's Pin was designed for and presented to TFWC by Linz Brothers Jewelers of Dallas. The pin is to be worn by the president during her two year term and is presented to the incoming president as part of the installation ceremony. Each member of the state Executive Committee is also presented with a pin representing her office. Over the years these pins became scratched, broken even lost. A new set of pins was made for the 1998 Installation of Officers.   Part of the Installation Ceremony at both the district and state level is the presentation of the President's pin. Over the years each district had its own District President's Pin. In 2010 new pins were designed so that all the district presidents had pins of the same design and are presented to the incoming president at her installation in her district.  Texas is the only state federation that has a building designed specifically as a state federation headquarters. This Georgian Revival building is located at 2312 San Gabriel in Austin and was completed in 1931. "The Fed", as it is known around the city of Austin, is located a few blocks from the University of Texas campus and marks the cornerstone of the historic Judge Hill neighborhood. In 1985 the TFWC Headquarters was officially listed on the National Register of Historic Places, designated a Texas Historic Landmark and an Austin Historic Landmark. The building has an office for the GFWC Texas Office Manager and State President as well as an apartment for the president and another for members of the Executive Committee. Both offices have been remodeled to facilitate a workable lay-out and furnished with up-to-date equipment so that both women can get their work done; the office manager on a daily basis and the president when she is in town.     The President's Suite has been remodeled and updated as well to accommodate a traveling president. Painted on the living room wall and visible as one enters the suite is the famous quote from Clara Driscoll, "In order that the club women of Texas may go about their splendid work with a lighter heart, I give them the Federation Headquarters."  Many plans were introduced to raise money to pay off the indebtedness of the headquarters. However, by 1938 raising money became very difficult and it was possible that the club women might loose their building. Mrs. Clara Driscoll agreed to loan the Federation $92,000.00 at 3% interest. The next year Mrs. Driscoll, a club woman herself and because of her faith in the organized woman's club movement, converted the loan into a gift. Mrs. Clara Driscoll saved the Alamo and saved the Texas Federation of Women's Clubs!   In addition to providing office space for professional staff and apartments for the State President and members of the Executive Committee, the building also houses the TFWC Women's Library, a collection of books by or about Texas women with research time available by appointment. The building has rooms of beautiful antiques, object d'art and furnishings donated by members. Where we live and work The structure of the state federation is parallel to that of GFWC; elected officers for two year terms beginning in the even numbered years; President, President-elect, First Vice President Dean of Reporting, Second Vice President Dean of Membership, Secretary. In addition GFWC Texas has a state Chairman of Trustees and state Scholarship Chairman who are members of the Executive Committee. In lieu of an elected Treasurer, there is a Financial Officer appointed by the president and an appointed Parliamentarian both approved by the Executive Committee. In its early days, the state was divided into districts, each district having one major city (which is why Dallas and Ft. Worth are in two different districts) easily accessible by public transportation such as train or bus and later automobile. In the beginning of the 1960-62 administration, maybe map of districts the state was divided into 14 districts and each district decided their own name in many cases the name symbolizing their geographic or historic area;  Alamo District with the major city San Antonio  Capitol District... Austin  Caprock... Lubbock  Heart of Texas... San Angelo  Key... Marshall  Magnolia... Beaumont  Mesquite... Abilene  Pioneer... Ft. Worth  San Jacinto... Houston  Santa Rosa... Wichita Falls  South Texas... Corpus Christi  Top of Texas... Amarillo  Trinity... Dallas Western District... Midland-Odessa  By 2004 two districts, Heart of Texas and Santa Rosa, dissolved and their clubs merged with other districts. Districts work in parallel with the state: elected officers, appointed board of directors with a board of directors meeting in the fall and a convention in the spring. Some districts have an annual summer workshop. The traditional club year is September through May clubs meeting once a month for a business meeting and program. Each club has the autonomy to determine their own course of study and decide on which projects to participate. The programs fall into the traditional six program service areas outlined by GFWC: Arts, Conservation, Education, Home Life, International Outreach and Public Issues. In 1953 GFWC Texas created a seventh department Texas Heritage and is the only state federation to include the history of the state in their course of study. Every club is encouraged to report their activities annually at their district conventions. The state conventions are designed for celebrating the years' activities and reward outstanding programs, projects and club women. The convention in the even numbered year is the Installation Convention when the new administration is installed. The women's clubs of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were mostly study clubs the members studying Shakespeare and the classics. As a need arose in their community the members tackled social issues; street lights, a hospital, clean water, sidewalks, railroad crossing barriers, and public libraries. In fact 75% of the public libraries in the United States were founded by federated women's clubs; 85% in the State of Texas! Now in the twenty-first century, GFWC Texas club women are expanding their efforts to include community service and civic improvements in their programs and projects. In 2008 GFWC adopted Domestic Violence Awareness and Prevention as their signature project and the Texas club women are active in this vital program. How we operate TFWC Historic Foundation In 1978 a forward step was taken when the members of the Texas Federation gave the responsibility for the maintenance and upkeep of the headquarters to a special group of clubwomen; the Trustees. On January 17, 1978 the TFWC Historical Foundation was established as a trust between TFWC and the TFWC Trustees. Each district elects a Trustee. This group of twelve women elects their own chairman who has a seat on the state Executive Committee. The Trustees are responsible for the maintenance and operation of the building. They have a professional building manager on staff that has his office at headquarters. The building and gracious and elegant rooms are available for weddings, receptions and corporate meetings. www.themansion.com 85% of the public libraries in Texas were  established by federated women's clubs
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